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(From left) Snead State Community College honored alumni and donors to the College Dr. Joe (left) and Mrs. Susan Nolen Story (second from left) during a celebration help in Monday, May 16. The Storys were welcomed by Snead State President Dr. Joe Whitmore (right) and the First Lady of Snead Mrs. Janet Whitmore.

“Give back to people who just need a chance.”

The words were spoken as a challenge to those attending a day of celebration on Monday, May 16, at Snead State Community College. Though they were inspiration to the friends, family, community supporters, and college employees in attendance, they were also the motive behind the generosity of Snead State alumni Dr. Joe and Susan Nolen Story of Florida.

The celebration honored a recent contribution by the couple in the amount of $2 million – funds that will be used in many ways, including the development of a Career and Technical Training Center located on the campus of Marshall Technical School in Guntersville.

Dr. and Mrs. Story attributed their success to the foundation they received at Snead State. Both came from families who couldn’t afford to pay for their children to go to college, but through Snead, the Storys received what they needed to earn their education and achieve very successful careers.

Dr. Story spent two years at Snead State before moving on to the University of Alabama and graduating with a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology and then earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Anesthesia from the University of Alabama in Birmingham. He eventually earned his medical doctorate (M.D.) and served as chief resident in his final year of residency with UAB.

Dr. Story is a highly accomplished physician, medical innovator, and serial entrepreneur. He practiced medicine for more than 30 years before he retired in 2003. The current CEO of Story Enterprises, he has participated in the development of over $3 billion in healthcare, biologics, and medical ventures. He designed and developed the internationally recognized Andrews Institute for Orthopedics and Sports Medicine with world-renowned orthopedic surgeon James Andrews and Baptist Health Care System, serving as its founding President of Research and Education as well as Chairman of the Surgery Center. He was a partner in the development of “The Blake” award-winning assisted living and memory care facilities across the Southeast and was a founding board member in MiMedx, the largest public biologics company in the U.S. He also developed Tri-care Rehabilitation Centers, the Portofino Medical Spa (created and led the Executive Physical Program) and the Columbiana Clinical Research Company, which was recognized for national and international drug trials.

Mrs. Story spent 15 months at Snead and achieved two years of college credits before transferring to Auburn University and earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Industrial Engineering with a minor in Mathematics – something she did in just over two years.

Mrs. Story is a highly accomplished and successful leader in business, policy insights and strategy. She served as CEO and CFO of American Water Works, Inc., the largest water utility in the U.S., headquartered in New Jersey, before retiring in 2020. She was one of only 23 female CEOs of S&P 500 companies during her six-year CEO tenure. Prior to American Water, she worked for Southern Company for 31 years, starting as a nuclear power engineer for Alabama Power Company and serving in her last two jobs as President and CEO of Gulf Power Company in Pensacola and then as President and CEO of Southern Company Services in Atlanta. She currently serves on the corporate boards of Fortune 500 companies Raymond James Financial, Dominion Energy, and Newmont Corporation, and is a founding board member and current advisor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) Board Advisory Council. She serves on the Moffitt Cancer Center Board of Advisors in Tampa, FL, and remains involved in Auburn University education efforts. She is a member of the Florida Council of 100 CEOs and Pensacola Bay Area Impact 100.

Through their Story Family Charitable Fund, the Storys are also co-funding partners with the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Foundation and the American Water Foundation on the roll-out of Joyner-Kersee’s “Winning in Life” program to children in five underserved communities throughout the U.S., as well as co-funding their local community’s First Responder Emergency Fund and other charitable efforts.

“Snead gave us a chance to realize our dreams and our hopes and what could be possible. As my wife and I give a little bit, we want to, in turn, give back to people who just need a chance. We also want to make Snead a bigger, greater place.

“I had to work to help my single mother pay the bills. The reason I got to come to college is because (Snead) gave me a scholarship. I ran the biology lab in the (Science) building, so I had some extra spending money. They gave me a chance. I went from here to Alabama and went on to medical school, but I’ll tell you a secret. If Snead College had a medical school, I would have done medical school here. I would have done my residency here. I would have stayed here,” said Dr. Story.

Mrs. Story stressed the significance of the role that an education at Snead State has in helping students achieve their American dream.

“We all have them. Everyone of us is where we are because of the people and the experiences that made us who we are. God has a plan for every one of our lives, and He accomplishes that plan, first of all, if we are willing to go along with that plan, but also by putting amazing people, places, and experiences in our lives that help us to get to that plan. This is all part of a plan, and Snead is such a big part of that,” said Mrs. Story.

The Storys told of the vital role Snead State played in their success, but the couple also shared the influence an education from Snead had on their families. Several members of Dr. Story’s family attended Snead, including his mother. Margaret Story began her college education after earning a GED. Eventually, she earned a Master’s Degree in Library Science and was named Marshall County “Teacher of the Year” on three different occasions.

Mrs. Story shared her story of her family growing up in poverty. Her father was in the military, and her mother was a waitress when they met. Her father, Tom Nolen, attended Snead State on the G.I. Bill after receiving his GED. He worked for a little more than minimum wage while taking classes and eventually earned certificates for technical training that prepared him for employment as a skilled craftsman.

“As we look back at those people, events, and institutions that helped make our American dream possible, we both think about Snead and how thankful we are for the opportunities the College gave us,” said Dr. Story.

“I want to thank all of you who are part of this great college. Sometimes we look at what we do every day, and we forget the significance of it. This college was established in 1898, and for 124 years, people’s lives have been changed because of you and the people who came before you. What you do is not just provide an education. You help lift people up. You help make people’s worlds bigger.”

The Storys’ generosity will make future Snead State students’ worlds bigger. For this, the College’s Administration Building bears the name Dr. Joe and Susan Story Administration Building. To honor the examples set by their parents of how a foundation for success can be built with a community college education, the College named the library in the Administration Building the Margaret Story Library, and when the new Career and Technical Training Center is completed, a training lab will bear the name of Tom Nolen.

“The pride we have to name the Administration Building after the Storys is well-founded. Their stories are two that became one story that we all can be proud of. We appreciate their generosity, but more than anything, we appreciate their example and their humble nature they have in recognizing the impact community colleges can have on lives today,” said Snead State President Dr. Joe Whitmore.

The College unveiled renderings of the Administration Building that showed the addition of the Storys’ names to the front and back of the building, as well as portraits of the Storys, Margaret Story and Tom Nolen, along with proclamations honoring their achievements and generosity. The College revealed the portrait of the Storys and Margaret Story and the new lettering identifying the Margaret Story Library that will remain in the Administration Building.

The recognitions did not stop there. Boaz Mayor David Dyar presented Dr. and Mrs. Story with a key to the city and offered his appreciation to the couple for their support of the College.

The Snead State Alumni Association presented Dr. Joe and Susan Nolen Story with the 2022 Alumnus and Alumna of the Year awards.

The Snead State Alumni Association presented Dr. and Mrs. Story with the Alumnus and Alumna of the Year awards for 2022.

“I hope that, as our students walk across our campus, as they see the Story name on the Administration Building, they will be reminded of the value of their education. As they hear your story and learn of how much you have given back to your community and to those who helped you along the way, I hope they are inspired. I hope your example shows them that the sky’s the limit when it comes to their future,” said Alumni Association President Cherri Barnard, who also serves in Snead State’s Workforce Development Department.

College representatives were not the only ones expressing their gratitude to the Storys for their generosity. Guests attending Monday’s celebration offered their own words of appreciation.

“We cannot thank you enough,” said Senate Majority Leader Clay Scofield. “I am particularly grateful and admire the fact that you chose to remember where you came from and your roots and what a special place (Snead State) is.”

Alabama Community College System Board of Trustees Member Dus Rogers said, “I want to thank you, on behalf of Chancellor Jimmy Baker and the Alabama Community College System Board of Trustees. Thank you very much for your extremely generous donation to Snead State Community College. Your gift will serve as a fitting memorial to your family, and it’ll help secure the dreams and education of countless people in our area.”

“Thank you for the way you’ve challenged people, and that is part of what this is really all about,” said Snead State Foundation President Frank McDaniel. “I’ve been involved with Snead for some 30 years now, and I’ve seen some things develop along the way. When we’ve had an issue in the community, I’ve seen how Snead came to the forefront to help people and give them a hand up. Now we’re just moving another step forward with the generosity of what you’ve given.”

The ACCS Board of Trustees Chairman Blake McAnaly said, “What a great story you have, having come through this institution, being a part of the community, and coming back and giving. The greatest job in the world is to be a vessel that the Lord will fill up, that you can pour out, and He will fill you up again to pour out for His Glory. Thank you both so much for what you do and for what you’ve done for this institution.”

Jack Hancock, the Chairman of the Snead State Foundation Investment Committee, said, “Your contribution will greatly affect the students of the present and future.”

Student achievement was the focus of the 2022 Commencement Ceremony at Snead State Community College on Thursday, May 12, in the Plunkett Wallace Gymnasium.

The ceremony began with approximately 185 out of 273 graduates walking in a processional into the gym as family, friends, guests, and Snead State faculty, staff and administrators looked on. After music performed by the Snead State Jazz Ensemble and the Commencement Choir and an invocation given by graduate and Student Government Association President Salma Santiago of Albertville, the ceremony’s focus turned to honoring the achievements of the graduates.

Destiny Wiley of Altoona received the Civitan Best All-Around Student Award. The Civitan Award is presented annually to the Best All-Around Student of the graduating class. To be eligible for this award, the student must have attended Snead State Community College for at least three semesters and attained a minimum cumulative academic average of 3.0 on a four-point scale. In addition, the student should have participated in extracurricular and community activities. The student is elected by a vote of the faculty from a list of eligible graduates who are participating in the graduation ceremonies.

Wiley was also awarded the James B. Allen Award. The award is presented annually to the Outstanding Student of the graduating class, but this year both students were chosen. This award is a gift of the late James B. Allen, United States Senator from Alabama. To be eligible for this award, the student must have exhibited outstanding qualities of leadership and service, attained a minimum cumulative academic average of 3.5, and attended Snead State Community College for at least three semesters. Recipients are elected by a vote of the faculty from a list of eligible graduates participating in the Spring ceremony. She is the first student to receive both awards.

Stephen Dean
Chase Williams

Chase Williams of Sardis City and Stephen Dean of Cleveland were recognized as this year’s members of the All-Alabama Academic Team. The All-Alabama Scholarship program is a complement to the All-USA National Academic Team Program, which is sponsored by USA Today, Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, and the American Association of Community Colleges.

Salma Santiago
Adam Self

The President’s Award is presented annually to the full-time sophomore student in both the Academic and Technical Divisions with the highest-grade point average on the greatest number of credit hours completed at Snead State. For the technical division, the 2022 President’s Award was presented to Christopher Adam Self of Boaz. For the academic division, the 2022 President’s Award is Salma Santiago of Albertville.

Snead State Community College President Dr. Joe Whitmore offered a few remarks, reminding the graduates of the questions they will face in life – from what job would they want, what college they would attend or what are the answers to the exam. The one question Dr. Whitmore spoke to was the one often asked young people – what do you want to be when you grow up?

“I think we’ve been asking the wrong question. Or we have been asking the right question in the wrong way. Instead of asking, ‘what do you want to be when you grow up’, I think the question should be, ‘what do you want to do when you grow up’. Do is an action verb that signifies…a process. It signifies an activity, and it signifies being engaged in what you are doing. It’s not that you want to be a teacher. It’s that you want to teach. You don’t just want to be a nurse. You want to nurse your patients and take care of them. You don’t just want to a coach. You want to have a team so that you can impart your wisdom and your knowledge. When you say ‘what do you want to be’, that’s a consciousness that defines your character. So no matter what you want to do when you grow up, there are certain things we should all strive to be.”

Dr. Whitmore continued, “Be humble. Being humble minimizes arrogance and reduces pride. Being humble will enable us to continue to be teachable throughout life. It allows us to acknowledge our sin and our shortcomings in our life and base it on the life that (Jesus) Christ modeled for us. True humility is remaining teachable no matter what you think you already know.

“So what do you think you want to be when you grow up? Be dependable. Being dependable is being constantly reliable and trustworthy. Do what you say you’re going to do and see it through. Continue in your commitments even if it means personal sacrifice. Be grateful. You didn’t get here by yourself. Gratitude is an attitude of being thankful, even when you don’t see all the things you have. It’s an aspect of worship, expressing to God what others have invested in your life. Never hesitate to say you’re thankful. What do you want to be when you grow up? Be honest. Honesty is the fastest way to keep a mistake from turning into a failure. Honesty and integrity are by far the most important traits and assets that you’re going to take into your chosen field. Be kind. Kindness begins in understanding that everyone is suffering at some point, and kindness doesn’t cost anything but means everything. Be happy. Hanging on to negative thoughts and feelings will do nothing but quickly drain what energy you have. You have to focus on the good that’s in your life and not let the pitfalls and failures steal your joy. You’re going to face storms, you’re going to face failures, you’re going to face grief. Find that happiness in your life.

“Find your passion and give it all you’ve got, but focus more on what you want to be when you grow up because it will define who you are,” Dr. Whitmore said.

Student recognitions continued when Snead State Executive Project Director of Workforce Enhancement Dr. Greg Randall recognized the first student in the Registered Apprenticeship Program to graduate.

The program was developed the program in 2019 for students pursuing an Industrial Systems Technology pathway to earn experience in a competitive field at a competitive wage while attending college. Kevin Franco of Boaz is the first graduate in the Registered Apprenticeship Program to graduate in the history of Snead State, and he earned an Associate in Applied Science degree in Industrial Systems Technology. He served as an apprentice with AlaTrade Foods, one of the important industry partners that help to make the apprenticeship program possible. AlaTrade was the first industry partner to join the apprenticeship program.

SGA Vice President Erika Duarte of Oneonta gave a benediction before the graduates exited the gym in a recessional, ending this year’s Commencement Ceremony.

Members of the Lady Parsons Softball Team as well as members of the Parson Baseball Team were presented their diplomas on Tuesday, May 10, at a special Commencement ceremony held at Snead’s ball fields. The baseball and softball graduates were unable to attend the traditional Commencement ceremony because they were traveling to compete in the NJCAA District Tournaments.

Snead State Community College inducted 21 students into the National Society of Leadership and Success, and 17 of the 21 participated in an induction ceremony on Thursday, April 28.

The Society is an organization that helps people discover and achieve their goals. The Society offers life-changing lectures from the nation’s leading presenters and a community where like-minded, success-oriented individuals come together and help one another succeed. The Society also serves as a powerful force of good in the greater community by encouraging and organizing action to better the world.

To be inducted in the leadership program, students have to complete requirements such as attending a two-hour orientation meeting, attending a four-hour leadership training day, attending at least three speaker broadcasts, meeting regularly with peer groups throughout the semester, and submitting at least three essays detailing goals and their progress.

Inductees into the National Society of Leadership and Success at Snead State Community College include:
Albertville
Hannah Duran, Diego Gomez, McKenna Ponder, Ruby Reyes and Marishell Vega.

Altoona
Destiny Wiley.

Arab
Jennifer Hardin and Laura Parker.

Ashville
Annaleisha Hardrick.

Attalla
Amanda Nichols.

Blountsville
Montserrat Robles Herrera.

Boaz
Alexandra Nance.

Crossville
Vanessa Cortez.

Gadsden
Belinda Jackson and Juliana Roland.

Guntersville
Tiffany Hammock.

Horton
Erika Aragon Cruz, Amber Lopez, and Araceli Soriano.

Oneonta
Dana Austin.

Springville
Briar Fowler.

Snead State Community College spotlighted students on Wednesday, April 27, for their achievements.

Award recipients include:

• Accounting – Isabel Garcia Rios of Albertville.
• Agricultural Science – Chase Kitchens of Albertville.
• All-Alabama Academic Team members – Chase Williams of Boaz and Stephen Dean of Oneonta.
• Anatomy/Physiology – Caroline Smith of Boaz.
• Biology- Fall Highest Biology 103 Average – Fiena Fuadah of Boaz; Spring Highest Biology 103 Average – Sarah Morgan of Stevenson.
• Business (Transfer Program) – Lawrence Hammonds of Hoover.
• Business (Applied) – Peyton Mooney of Dawson.
• Chemistry (Inorganic) – McKenzie Williams of Boaz; Alyssa Stanley of Crossville and Jansen Rogers of Boaz.
• Chemistry (Organic) – Salma Santiago of Albertville, Chase Williams of Boaz, and Mauren Arreaga of Albertville.
• Chemistry – Sarah Morgan of Stevenson, Stephen Dean of Oneonta, Amber Lopez of Horton, and Alyssa Cook of Crossville.
• Computer Science (Cybersecurity) – Christopher Adam Self of Boaz.
• Computer Science (IT Administration) – Marckenson Etienne of Albertville.
• Computer Science (Transfer) – Michelle Patel of Albertville.
• Dean’s Awards – Amber Lopez of Horton (Academic) and Jake Knighten of Boaz (Technical).
• Economics – Grace Kelley of Boaz.
• English – Hannah Ball of Guntersville and Emily Ledbetter of Albertville.
• History (US History) – McKenzie Williams of Boaz.
• History (Western Civilization) – Lillian Thompson of Horton.
• Industrial Maintenance (Welding) – Rodolfo Baltazar Diego of Albertville.
• Industrial Systems Technology – Anthony Vazquez of Albertville.
• Mathematics – Cole Bowling of Guntersville (Freshman Award) and Ruby Reyes of Albertville (Sophomore Award).
• Music – (Best All-Around Music Student) Taven Baker of Boaz.
• Nursing – Jesslyn Barrentine of Odenville (Highest GPA-First Level RN). Rebecca Oden of Boaz (Highest GPA-Second Level RN), Siera Stegeman of Albertville (Clinical Excellence-First Level RN), and Shay Colvin of Boaz (Clinical Excellence-Second Level).
• Philosophy – Aubrey Parker of Fort Payne and Madalyn Droze of Boaz.
• Political Science – Terry Thacker of Attalla.
• President’s Award – Salma Santiago (Academic) and Christopher Self of Boaz (Technical).
• Theater – Nathan Wilson of Arab.

Snead State students receiving transfer scholarships from four-year universities were also recognized. Those students included:

Athens State University
• Jessica Dukelow of Athens
• Sonya Evans of Arab
• Kenleigh Huff of Attalla
• Eric Edge of Gadsden
• Stephen Dean of Oneonta
• Kyndra Harraid of Albertville
• Rylee McCullars of Albertville
• Serra Noojin of Attalla
• Makenlee Wiggins of Boaz
• Benjamin Word of Boaz
• Chantal Eubanks of Guntersville
• Logan Parker of Arab
• Gabrielle Rogers of Attalla

Auburn University
• Brock Biddle of Albertville
• Eric Edge of Gadsden
• Davey Graham of Dawson
• Kenleigh Huff of Attalla
• Michael Kitchens of Albertville
• Carsen Milner of Boaz
• Logan Walls of Boaz
• Chase Williams of Boaz
• Karli Yarbrough of Boaz

Jacksonville State University
• Preston Adelman of Boaz
• Guadalupe Aguilera Chavez of Albertville
• Chala Anderson of Gurley
• Allison Arenth of Anniston
• Mauren Arreaga of Albertville
• Kyler Beshears of Attalla
• Maddux Bopp of Albertville
• Braxton Brooks of Boaz
• Ronald Clark of Gallant
• Maleah Collins of Boaz
• Samuel Cosby of Centre
• Gabriel Cruz of Albertville
• Madeleine Damas of Huntsville
• Erika Duarte of Oneonta
• Eric Edge of Gadsden
• Trey Elledge of Guntersville
• Chloe Farris of Albertville
• Briar Fowler of Springville
• Lizet Cruz Franco of Albertville
• Gabriel Gardner of Crossville
• Diego Gomez of Albertville
• Stephanie Graham of Altoona
• Katherine Gray of Birmingham
• Kelsee Haynes of Cullman
• Alexis Henderson of Boaz
• Hailey Brooke Hill of Boaz
• Kenleigh Huff of Attalla
• Emily Kate Jones of Boaz
• Grace Kelley of Boaz
• Kathryn Langley of Arab
• Madison Lewis of Albertville
• Jeffery Martin of Ball Ground, GA
• Anna Matthews of Boaz
• Kyle Morgan of Attalla
• Alexandra Nance of Boaz
• Serra Noojin of Attalla
• Mary Ocampo of Crossville
• Jacob Peppers of Altoona
• Mackenzie Pitt of Guntersville
• Macy Pointer of Boaz
• Jennifer Pruitt of Boaz
• Ruby Reyes of Albertville
• Alayna Rice of Grant
• Gabrielle Rogers of Attalla
• Andrew Smith of Albertville
• Jocelyn Smith of Dawson
• Alyssa Stanley of Crossville
• Erica Stephens of Altoona
• Carson Swatek of Boaz
• Yuliana Vega of Crossville
• Lauren Ward of Horton
• Ricky Watson of Guntersville
• Destiny Wiley of Altoona
• Sarah Williams of Albertville
• Lauren Womack of Henager

University of Alabama
• Blakely Burr of Bessemer
• Stephen Dean of Oneonta
• Krimson Kidd of Crossville
• Esther Laguerre of Guntersville
• Esly Mesadieu of Albertville
• Robert Stamba of Helena

University of Alabama in Birmingham
• Salma Santiago of Albertville
• Mauren Arreaga of Albertville
• Lawrence Hammonds of Hoover
• Laura Forsythe of Guntersville
• Arturo Ramos Jimenez of Albertville
• Diego Gomez of Albertville
• Julissa Hernandez of Albertville
• Kenleigh Huff of Attalla
• Zuleyma Figueroa of Crossville
• Eric Edge of Gadsden
• Molly Morris of Boaz
• Taylor Freeman of Boaz
• Lauren Womack of Henager
• Mckenna Flynn of Weaver
• Esly Mesadieu of Albertville

University of Alabama in Huntsville
• Abigail Bennett of Scottsboro
• Taylor Freeman of Boaz
• Shannon Hood of Albertville
• Minh Ly of Albertville
• Michelle Patel of Albertville
• Alisha Rogers of Guntersville

University of Montevallo
• Aracely Chacon of Oneonta
• William Owens of Oneonta

The College also recognized students’ achievements through student organizations. The Ambassadors, Phi Beta Lambda and Student Government Association were recognized. The History@Snead organization received the Club of the Year award.

Snead State Community College had 14 students to attend the virtual 2022 Alabama Phi Beta Lambda State Conference.

Students interested in the fields of business and economics are encouraged to join Phi Beta Lambda, but students in other majors are welcome to join. This year, the student majors ranged from elementary education to engineering, criminal justice and business. The purposes of the organization are to develop competent, aggressive business leadership and to create interest and understanding in business occupations.

During the State Conference, the students competed against other college and university students from across the state. All 14 students placed in at least one of their competitive events.

The team of Erika Aragon Cruz of Horton, Cindy Guerrero of Boaz, Amber Lopez of Horton, Marisol Lopez of Albertville, and Nancy Santiago of Albertville won first place in Parliamentary Procedure.

The individual winners from Snead State included:

Albertville
• Jareny Lopez – second place in Organizational Behavior and Leadership and third place in Management Concepts
• Alicia Ramirez – second place in Marketing Concepts and fourth place in Retail Management
• Daniela Ramirez-Soriano – first place in Financial Concepts and second place in Personal Finance
• Arturo Ramos – first place in Project Management and second place in Management Concepts

Attalla
• Jake Tidwell – first place in Network Design and first place in Networking Concepts

Boaz
• Raven Fox – first place in Management Concepts and first place in Marketing Concepts
• Cindy Guerrero – first place in Personal Finance
• Adriana Ponce – first place in Desktop Publishing and third place in Retail Management

Crossville
• Gabriela Andres – first place in Entrepreneurship Concepts and second place in Retail Management

Gallant
• Ronald Clark – first place in Justice Administration and first place in Sports Management and Marketing

Horton
• Erika Aragon Crus – second place in Sports Management and Marketing

Snead State’s softball team went 3-2 over the weekend to finish runner-up in the Alabama Community College Conference softball championship.

Snead lost the championship game 8-0 to Wallace-Hanceville.

With the runner-up finish, Snead advances to the NJCAA Division I Softball Mid-Atlantic District Championship. The Parsons will travel to Spartanburg, SC to face Spartanburg Methodist in a best of three series Friday and Saturday. The winner will advance to the NJCAA National Tournament May 23-28 in Yuma, Arizona.

Snead is 34-24 overall and finished 20-9 in ACCC North Division.

The Parsons opened the state tournament with a 6-5 dramatic walk-off win over Shelton State. Molly Pendley, Aaliyah Byrd and Chloe Chisenall all hit homeruns against the Bucs. Byrd’s homer was the walk-off that sealed the Lady Parson’s first win of the tournament. Pendley tallied three hits, including a double to go along with the homer. Chisenall had two homers and drove in three runs. Madison Wright pitched the entire game for the win. She allowed five hits and struck out six.

Snead then beat Coastal Alabama-South 7-1. Julia Hurley had three hits while Wright and Blakely Burr each had two. Chisenall had two runs batted in. Wright earned the win, going five innings while allowing five hits and striking out five. Reagan Cornelius pitched two innings, giving up two hits and striking out one.

Snead suffered its first tournament loss, a 4-0 setback to Wallace-Hanceville. Rylee Bartlett had the only hit for the Parsons.

In an elimination game, Snead rallied for an 8-5 win over Shelton State to advance to the championship game and a rematch with Wallace-Hanceville.

In the second win over Shelton State, Pendley went 4-4, including a double, three homeruns and five RBIs. Burr and Chisenall also added homeruns. Wright pitched a complete game and struck out four to earn her third win of the tournament.

Burr had two hits and McKenna Jones had one.

Pendley, Wright and Chisenall each were selected to the all-tournament team.

Heading into the District Championship Pendley leads the Parsons in batting with a .465 average. She also leads the team and state with 21 homeruns and her team-leading 63 RBI is second in the state. The 21 homeruns are a Snead single-season record. Pendley also held Snead State’s career homerun record with a total of 39 so far in her career.

Wright has started 31 games and is 21-8 with the win’s being a single-season school record. The West Alabama signee has a 2.24 ERA, struck out 262, another single-season school record, and issued only 42 walks. Wright’s 262 strikeouts are No. 2 in the nation. Cornelius has started 13 games and is 7-9 with a 3.58 ERA and has struck out 83.

Wright and Pendley were selected to First Team All-Region and qualify for All-American. Burr and Byrd were Second Team All-Region selectees.

The Snead State Community College Softball Team finished as runner-up at the Alabama Community College Conference Tournament in Alabaster. Snead State advances to the NJCAA Mid-Atlantic District Championship May 13-14 at Spartanburg Methodist College in South Carolina. The champion will advance to the NJCAA National Softball Tournament May 23-28 in Yuma.
Dr. Joe and Susan Nolen Story

The success of Dr. Joe and Susan Nolen Story has come full circle with the Florida couple giving back to the college that was a pivotal influence not only for them, but also for their family.

Snead State Community College received a $2 million donation from Dr. and Mrs. Story as a show of their appreciation of “the time and experiences we had at Snead State.”

“We look forward to (having a role in) the continuing growth and prosperity of Snead State Community College,” said Dr. Story.

In honor of the Storys’ generous contribution, Snead State is hosting a celebration on Monday, May 16, from 3-5 p.m. at what is now known as the Dr. Joe and Susan Story Administration Building, located on the Boaz campus at 220 North Walnut Street.

“We are honored the Storys chose to renew their relationship with Snead State. Their generous donation will be used for various projects and improvements across the campus. We will also seek ideas and input for future projects from the Story family. I believe this is a partnership that will continue to reap benefits for the College and our students,” said Snead State Community College President Dr. Joe Whitmore.

The Storys’ experience at Snead State is similar to many students who come to the College. For Dr. Story, his scholarships and work study opportunities helped him to go to college.

“I was working to help my single mom pay the bills for the two of us and my sister, Mary. I had always dreamed of being a physician, and Snead offered me an opportunity and hope at a critical time in my life, without which I may not have been able to go to college,” he said.

After his two years at Snead State, Dr. Story graduated from the University of Alabama with a Bachelor’s degree in biology and then earned a Bachelor’s degree in Anesthesia from the University of Alabama in Birmingham. He eventually earned his medical doctorate (M.D.) and served as chief resident in his final year of residency with UAB.

“If I could have completed all of my college work, including medical school, at Snead, I would have,” Dr. Story said. “My entire family attended Snead, and Snead played a critical role in my mom starting with her GED and eventually achieving a Master’s Degree in Library Science,” he said.

Margaret Pritchett Story was working three jobs, but Snead State offered her the flexibility to continue her studies while supporting her family. During her career as a librarian, she was named Marshall County “Teacher of the Year” on three different occasions.

Snead State’s library, located inside the Administration Building, will now be known at the Margaret Story Library in honor of her sacrifice, hard work and commitment to education.

Susan Nolen Story also came from a family who did not have a lot of money, and she bore the responsibility of paying her way through college.

“I took a full load of courses while also working at the Sand Mountain Reporter to earn money for school,” she said.

Mrs. Story spent 15 months at Snead and achieved two years of college credits before transferring to Auburn University and earning a Bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering with a minor in mathematics – something she did in just over two years.

“I received such an incredibly strong education from my calculus and physics professors at Snead that my work study job at Auburn was tutoring math and physics,” said Mrs. Story.

Mrs. Story is the daughter of another Snead State alum, her father Tom Nolen. Mr. Nolen also began with a GED and worked for a little more than minimum wage while taking some academic and technical certification classes at Snead on the G.I. Bill. He eventually earned enough education and training to qualify for a higher skilled welding and pipefitting job and to make additional money to support his family.

Snead State will also honor Mr. Nolen once the College completes construction on a new Workforce Training Center, to be located on the campus of Marshall Technical School. A training lab in the Workforce Training Center will be named for Tom Nolen in recognition of his support for career and technical education.

“As we look back at those people, events and institutions that helped make our American dream possible, we both think about Snead and how thank we are for the opportunities the College gave us,” said Dr. Story.

“We believe it is important for us to give back and, hopefully, help provide opportunities for others facing life’s challenges in the way we did – and to have a shot at their dreams just as we did,” said Mrs. Story.

The Storys took their education and their dreams and built successful careers that have opened up chances for them to make a difference in their communities across the U.S.

Dr. Story is a highly accomplished physician, medical innovator and serial entrepreneur. He practiced medicine for more than 30 years before he retired in 2003. The current CEO of Story Enterprises, he has participated in the development of over $3 billion in healthcare, biologics and medical ventures. He designed and developed the internationally recognized Andrews Institute for Orthopedics and Sports Medicine with world-renowned orthopedic surgeon James Andrews and Baptist Health Care System, serving as its founding President of Research and Education as well as Chairman of the Surgery Center. He was a partner in the development of “The Blake” award-winning assisted living and memory care facilities across the Southeast and was a founding board member in MiMedx, the largest public biologics company in the U.S. He also developed Tri-care Rehabilitation Centers, the Portofino Medical Spa (created and led the Executive Physical Program) and the Columbiana Clinical Research Company, which was recognized for national and international drug trials.

Mrs. Story is a highly accomplished and successful leader in business, policy insights and strategy. She served as CEO and CFO of American Water Works, Inc., the largest water utility in the U.S., headquartered in New Jersey, before retiring in 2020. She was one of only 23 female CEOs of S&P 500 companies during her six-year CEO tenure. Prior to American Water, she worked for Southern Company for 31 years, starting as a nuclear power engineer for Alabama Power Company and serving in her last two jobs as President and CEO of Gulf Power Company in Pensacola and then as President and CEO of Southern Company Services in Atlanta. She currently serves on the corporate boards of Fortune 500 companies Raymond James Financial, Dominion Energy, and Newmont Corporation, and is a founding board member and current advisor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) Board Advisory Council. She serves on the Moffitt Cancer Center Board of Advisors in Tampa, FL, and remains involved in Auburn University education efforts. She is a member of the Florida Council of 100 CEOs and Pensacola Bay Area Impact 100.

Through their Story Family Charitable Fund, the Storys are also a co-funding partner with the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Foundation and the American Water Foundation on the roll-out of Joyner-Kersee’s “Winning in Life” program to children in five underserved communities throughout the U.S., as well as co-funding their local community’s First Responder Emergency Fund and other charitable efforts.

“We often speak on the value of a community college education, but Dr. and Mrs. Story are examples of how far a community college education can take you. Through their example, they show our students that their success is only limited by how hard they are willing to work and by how big they are willing to dream,” said Dr. Whitmore.

The Celebration for Dr. and Mrs. Story will include a special ceremony at 3 p.m. in Fielder Auditorium located in the Administration Building. A reception will follow the ceremony. The community is invited to attend.

The Snead State Community College Music Department is hosting a variety of events this spring that will delight music lovers.

Snead State Jazz Band

Snead State is hosting its annual Jazz Night Jazz Showcase on Thursday, April 21, at 7 p.m. in the Bevill Center Auditorium. Jazz Night will feature performances at the Snead State Jazz Band and the Albertville High School Jazz Band.

Community Wind Band

The Snead State Community Wind Band will present its spring concert on Sunday, April 24. The Community Wind Band, under the direction of Mike McGee, will present “A Picturesque Voyage” beginning at 3 p.m. in the Bevill Center Auditorium. The Community Wind Band is a concert band comprised of Snead State students, adults within the Snead State area, and area high school students who have demonstrated excellence in All-State tryouts.

College Street Singers

The Music Department Spring Concert will be held Friday, April 29, at 7 p.m. in the Bevill Center Auditorium. The concert will feature performances by music students, the College Chorus, the College Street Singers, the Jazz Band and more.

Masterworks Chorale

The Masterworks Chorale will present a concert called “America Sings!” on Thursday, May 5, at 7 p.m. in the Bevill Center Auditorium. The Snead State Masterworks Chorale is a non-auditioned group of singers made up of Snead students, faculty, staff, and persons from the Sand Mountain region who love to sing.

Admission is free to all of the spring music events. The Bevill Center is located at 500 Usry Street in Boaz.

Snead State Community College is participating in the Northeast Alabama Heart Walk by hosting a Pop-Up Heart Walk taking place April 20 on Snead State’s Boaz campus from 12-1:30 p.m. The Heart Walk is the signature fundraising event hosted by the American Heart Association, the world’s leading nonprofit organization focused on heart and brain health for all.

“Snead is honored to host a Pop-Up Heart Walk for our students, faculty and staff, and community to come out and support the American Heart Association,” Snead State Event Coordinator Lindsey King said. “Our campus lends itself well to a scenic, safe, and enjoyable walking experience. Whether you like walking for miles or just half a block, it’s about supporting a great cause.”

This will be the first year for Snead State to participate in the Northeast Alabama Heart Walk in support of the American Heart Association, a likeminded organization working to increase physical and mental health, to improve overall wellness and to change health outcomes in our community.

“We have a goal of $2,500 to raise between our students, faculty and staff, and community,” Ms. King said. “We are hopeful we can surpass that goal with your help. We all have had family and friends who have had heart disease. This is a time to come together to walk in their honor, memory, or just to get out and enjoy the nice weather.”

There are several teams already formed or started for this Heart Walk event, including a team for Snead State students, a team for Snead State faculty and staff, and a few community teams. Marshall-DeKalb Electric Cooperative is encouraging their employees to participate, as well as Boaz Rotary Club and several others.

The Heart Walk will begin in the Plunkett Wallace Gymnasium parking lot and make a block around the Administration Building and back to the gym. There is no fee to walk, but registration is recommended online or at the event. Fundraising is encouraged.

The funds raised from the Northeast Heart Walk go towards the American Heart Association’s work as a relentless force for a world of longer, healthier live. Visit www.gadsdenheartwalk.org to learn more or sign up to participate.

Snead State Community College chose two sophomores to represent the College on the All-Alabama Academic Team. Chase Williams of Sardis City, right, and Stephen Dean of Cleveland will be honored at a banquet on April 21.

Two sophomores were chosen to represent Snead State Community College as part of the 2022 All-Alabama Academic Team.

Chase Williams of Sardis City and Stephen Dean of Cleveland, along with students representing all of the two-year colleges within the Alabama Community College System, were nominated for the All-Alabama Academic Team based on their academics and campus activities. Students selected must possess a minimum GPA of 3.25, be involved in campus activities and have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours at their respective colleges.

Chase plans to transfer to Auburn University from Snead State. His plans are to major in Pre-Pharmacy with a goal to earn a Doctorate of Pharmacy degree.

“I want to help my community and make my family proud,” Chase said.

Stephen plans to attend the University of Alabama on a full scholarship after finishing at Snead State. He plans to earn a Bachelor’s degree in Biology.

“My goal is to teach general science courses to high school students,” Stephen said.

Stephen and Chase will be recognized as part of the All-Alabama Academic Team during a banquet on April 21 in Birmingham.

The All-Alabama Academic Team Recognition Program was founded in 1995 to complement the All-USA National Academic Team Program sponsored by USA Today, Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, and the American Association of Community Colleges. This year, the students were honored as part of a virtual recognition program.